St. John's University Housing

The majority of St. John's University on campus housing for undergraduates students are in one of six dorms on the university's main campus in Queens, an idyllic, 105-acre spread with wide lawns, collegiate-looking high-tech academic buildings, and state-of-the-art athletic facilities for its fanatically followed Big East Division I sports teams.

Residents of the traditional, on campus variety of housing at St. John's—and there are some 4,000 undergraduate and graduate students living on campus during any given year—enjoy modern, reasonably spacious dorm rooms, and the relatively high bathroom-to-student ratio seems to be a big plus, too. There are also a small number of rooms available for St. John's housing at the university's Staten Island campus—79 total apartments, to be exact, with a capacity of 231 students—as well as an even smaller number at the St. John's 10-story "vertical campus", a part of the business school, on Murray Street in Manhattan. 

So there definitely is on campus housing available, and, by most reports, it's pleasant and comfortable, but recent records show that fewer than one-quarter of the university's total student body of nearly 20,000 can get one of the on-campus rooms. Which means that all other students seeking housing near St. John's University, whether you're in the graduate or undergraduate population, must find a place to live off campus, preferably in the tidy, residential Queens communities of Fresh Meadows or Jamaica Estates.

 

St. John's University Off Campus Housing

St. John's off-campus housing in either neighborhood often consists of single-, two- and three-family homes, as well as a few large and mid-sized apartment buildings near the commercial strips. Off-campus housing, either single rooms in a share situation, or standard NY apartments, can be found through numerous websites, including Urban Edge, where we offer listings only for no-fee apartments, available directly from the owner or building manager.

Graduate and undergraduate students at the Queens campus who are looking for St. John's off-campus housing (and who don't have car) might also consider neighborhoods along the F train line, the closest subway, such as Kew Gardens, Rego Park and Forest Hills. The only downside to taking the F to school is that an additional transfer, to a MTA public bus, is required. Most students who live in off-campus housing drive to school, however, but parking on or near campus is a perennial issue, even for those with university-issued parking permits.

Of course, St. John's students with programs on the Staten Island or Manhattan campuses (not to mention the Rome campus, in Italy!) should look for off-campus housing close to their respective school's locations.

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