Living in the Greenwood Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn


Greenwood Heights Apartments

Sharing the name with Greenwood Cemetery at the eastern border, Greenwood Heights sits southwest of Gowanus and northeast of Sunset Park on the western side of Brooklyn.

 

This unique neighborhood has a character all its own, and the mix of styles makes for some interesting architecture. Although the borders are vague, you'll find most Greenwood Heights apartments between the Prospect Expressway at the north and 36th Street at the south.

 

Interesting wood-frame townhouses set this community apart from other unique places in Brooklyn. The NY apartments in this neighborhood are well-priced alternatives to other rowhouse sections of Brooklyn, and can be found in a mix of brick, multi-family units and turn-of-the century wood-sided porch homes.

 

Life Around Greenwood Heights

Greenwood Cemetery is this community's easterly neighbor, and is a significant piece of Brooklyn's historic collage. It was finished in 1838 having achieved the landscape architects' intentions of creating a park-like, naturalistic setting. The ornate architecture can be found throughout, with the stunning gothic style Main Entrance gate, and the Cemetery's Chapel. At 478 acres, the Greenwood Cemetery is registered as a National Historic Landmark.

 

This neighborhood is an average of two avenue blocks wide, and with a narrow sliver like that, every Greenwood Heights apartment is within walking distance of the commercial strip, Fourth Avenue. But this section of Fourth Avenue is more of a thoroughfare than the "main street" of other neighborhoods. But this avenue provides access to the subway at three stations along the length of the neighborhood. The R train can be caught at Prospect Avenue Station to the north, and at 25th Street Station near the center, with the D and N express trains available at the 36th Street Station at the southern end. But a quick transfer to the local R train is easy from almost any other subway line through the Atlantic Avenue-Pacific Street transportation hub.

 

Although Fourth Avenue can't rave about its fine dining, the community's northerly neighbor Windsor Terrace has just about everything to satisfy a hungry family, a day of shopping, or a yoga class. And just a few more stops on the train or bus, and you're at the shops and stores in Park Slope. But unlike the uniform buildings in these bordering communities, Greenwood Heights has its own unique mix of historic styles.


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