Living in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn


NY apartments at relatively bargain prices can still be had in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Red Hook. This is especially true when compared to the community's next-door neighbors in Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens.

 

The biggest difference between Red Hook and adjoining neighborhoods in Southern Brooklyn (which actually, geographically, is more west-central Brooklyn, but the area has been stuck with the South Brooklyn tag for generations) in its developmental history. 

 

Red Hook apartments stand in one of the few areas in town that isn't served by any subway line. When Red Hook housing was filled with longshoremen who worked the docks that dominated the nearby waterfront, it didn't much matter that the neighborhood was a little isolated. Today, when prospective residents of Red Hook rental apartments want to commute to their office buildings in Downtown Brooklyn or Manhattan, the lack of a subway can be a deal breaker, and so prices remain very attractive.

 

Red Hook apartments reside on the Brooklyn peninsula separated from the rest of the borough by Hamilton Avenue and the Gowanus Expressway, as well as the Gowanus Canel, Gowanus Bay, and Buttermilk Channel. The recently added Water Taxi service to downtown Manhattan helps, and if you have a car, the entrance to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel is right there.

 

But despite its relative isolation, there has also been enough redevelopment near the community's spectacular waterfront, and enough refurbishment of once-dilapidated townhouses amid the industrial warehouses, that Red Hook today certainly qualifies as a "neighborhood in transition", as creative types, young people, and more adventurous families are moving into what one local artist dubbed this "reindustrial" community.

 

Leading the redevelopment by the Red Hook waterfront—with its stunning views of downtown Manhattan, and the only place in all of New York City where you can see the Statue of Liberty "face-to-face"—is the Swedish furniture giant IKEA, which opened its only New York City store here in 2008, as well as the huge Fairway Supermarket, with its excellent prices and high-quality, fresh food.

 

Dozens of smaller businesses have also staked a claim in Red Hook of late, especially on or near Van Brunt Street, including popular restaurants like comfort-food serving The Good Fork; the highly-designed Baked, home of some of the best cupcakes in the city; Steve's Authentic Key Lime Pies, which sells a world-class version of that classic dessert; micro-brewer Six Points Craft Ales; and Hope and Anchor, which, for better or worse, introduced a Manhattan-y scene to the area about five years ago. Also a big draw these days is Red Hook Park, home to dozens of soccer, softball and baseball leagues as well as, on the weekends all summer long, the famous Red Hook food vendors, which serve delicious Latin American specialties to long lines of pilgrims from all over the city.  


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