Living in the Little Italy neighborhood of Manhattan


Selected No Fee Apartments in Little Italy

View ALL of the available no fee apartments in
Little Italy. Below are a sampling of what is on the market.

$3,395
1 Bedroom
$3,100
1 Bedroom
$3,250
1 Bedroom
$2,195
Studio
$2,895
1 Bedroom

In recent years, New York's Little Italy, once exclusively the enclave to recent Italian immigrants, has opened up its old-world doors to young families and well-heeled professionals, drawn to the newly renovated Little Italy apartments located on charming cobblestone streets.

 

Serious apartment seekers soon discover that because of Little Italy's small size, charm and history, rents here are on a par with other NY apartments in other desirable neighborhoods.

 

In its heyday, Little Italy spread from Canal Street north to Houston, but now its borders are limited to about four city blocks, predominantly on Mulberry between Canal and Broome streets.  If you do score a Little Italy apartment, step outside and you will be surrounded by the sights, sounds, and smells of Italian cuisine and the neighborhood's enlivening culture.

A concentrated row of restaurants await those who love their Italian prepared in a dozen different ways. Grotto Azzurra, an underground grotto, is now a wine cellar with a dining room at street level. Benito II is a good choice for a hearty low-cost meal and, more informally, Caffe Roma is an appealing café and ice-cream parlor.  

 

Other notorious restaurants and cafes still have their home along these historic blocks. The landmark La Melacan seat 500 and still serve generous portions, while the always-packed Lombardi's boasts that it was the first pizzeria in America. As if all this weren't enough, Little Italy's annual outdoor San Gennaro Festival in September is exploding with a stunning array of Italian treats, both savory and sweet.

 

Little Italy's Old St. Patrick's Cathedral, at the corner of Prince and Mulberry streets, was New York's only Roman Catholic Cathedral until 1879. Its impressive Gothic interior now welcomes visitors and residents as a parish church.


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