Living in the Sutton Place neighborhood of Manhattan


Selected No Fee Apartments in Sutton Place

View ALL of the available no fee apartments in
Sutton Place. Below are a sampling of what is on the market.

$3,715
1 Bedroom
$2,795
1 Bedroom
$8,235
3 Bedroom
$2,250
Alcove Studio
$17,500
3 Bedroom
$2,695
1 Bedroom
$3,650
1 Bedroom
$2,895
Studio
$3,595
1 Bedroom
$14,000
3 Bedroom

One of New York City's smallest and most exclusive neighborhoods, Sutton Place, is loaded with regal townhouses and lovely pre-war apartment buildings.

 

Notable architcture of the neighborhood includes the legendary One Sutton Place South, designed by Rosario Candela; the palatial One Sutton Place North, built with Vanderbilt money; and the five-story home next door, once the home of J.P. Morgan's daughter, now the official residence of the United Nations Secretary General.

 

There are Sutton Place apartments available for rent, however, you should expect to pay a premium for the privacy, security and understated elegance that the neighborhood's monied class insists upon, and receives. Sutton Place, the avenue, runs for only two blocks, between 57th and 59th Streets, right near the East River, and is the core of the neighborhood, which most agree extends down to 53rd Street, and west over to Second Avenue. 

Sutton Place, the avenue, was only named in the late 19th century (it used to just be considered part of Avenue A), and it didn't become the home of the New York City's wealthiest until the 1920s, when the majestic Sutton Place townhouses sprung up overlooking the river.

Since then, Sutton Place has been a magnet for prominent New Yorkers, from current residents such as I.M. Pei, Mario Cuomo, Kenneth Cole and Sigourney Weaver, and back through time to include luminaries like Bill Blass, Michael Jackson, Bobby Short, Freddy Mercury, Joan Crawford, and Marilyn Monroe and her then-husband Arthur Miller. 

Sutton Place residents mostly rely on the city at large for their shopping, dining and entertainment needs, as there is not much commercial space in the neighborhood. There are two public parks in the Sutton Place community, both overlooking the East River, at the end of 57th and 53rd Streets, respectively. The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is currently trying to double the size the 57th Street park by reclaiming the land it says belongs to the people, but which now sits behind an iron fence and functions as a private garden for One Sutton Place South residents.   


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