Living in the Glen Oaks neighborhood of Queens

Glen Oaks Apartments

On the eastern end of Queens is the neighborhood of Glen Oaks, which sits adjacent to Long Island's Nassau County. This enclave is commonly recognized by its large garden apartment complexes, mainly the co-ops of Glen Oaks Village, while the residential blocks occur in rather small pockets at the edges of the neighborhood.

 

You'll find the majority of Glen Oaks apartments in the eastern corner of the community, where Lakeville Road meets Union Turnpike. This section spans ten blocks, where single-family homes sit on tree-lined streets. It's important to note that the rentals in this section of Queens don't resemble the typical NY apartments, and are often house rentals.

 

Life in Glen Oaks

Glen Oaks apartments are situated between Grand Central Parkway and Union Turnpike, with Cross Island Parkway to the west and Lakeville Road to the east. A good fraction of the land is utilized by the Long Island Jewish Medical Center. At the northern edge of the neighborhood is the gated, coop community of North Shore Towers, where tenants have exclusive access to the adjacent country club and golf course.

 

But on the public streets of Glen Oaks, you'll find the somewhat typical Queens residential community: tree-lined blocks with single-family homes. And in most cases, the homes are modest-sized, and sport small front lawns and driveways. Of the few neighborhood streets, most blocks are rather uniform, where the shapes and styles of the houses are quite similar, and sometimes identical.

 

As every resident of eastern Queens knows, it isn't easy taking public transportation into Manhattan. But residents of Glen Oaks apartments can't complain too much, as they are about a mile from the Floral Park Station of the Long Island Railroad. Hopping on this commuter rail will take passengers into Penn Station in about 35 minutes.

 

Although Glen Oaks doesn't have a particular "main street" or other commercial center, many residents can find retail and restaurants dotting the Union Turnpike at the southern end of town. As for parks and attractions, this neighborhood doesn't have much to brag about. However, the community is home to the Queens County Farm Museum, where one can visit New York City's last (and only) undisturbed piece of farmland. Owned by the city's Department of Parks and Recreation, this 47-acre tract is as interesting as it is educational, and gives the public access to the fields, livestock, and historic farmhouse, while providing an opportunity for visitors to try their hand at farmwork. If you're in the market for a rental in a single family home, then be sure to check out this eastern Queens community.


Back to the top